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The Islander Newspaper Ascension Island
  Issue No. 2221 Online Edition Tuesday 22 July 2014 
Home | February 2012 Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Ascension : Met Office - Weather Report
Submitted by The Islander (Met Office) 02.02.2012 (Article Archived on 16.02.2012)

There have been many reported sights of the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) in northern parts of the UK this week due to increased sun activity.

 

Statistics for the week ending Monday 30-Jan-12 

 

Max (Celsius)

Min (Celsius)

Rainfall (mm)

AIRHEAD

29.5

22.8

0.4

TRAVELLERS

29.4

21.5

TR

RESIDENCY

24.4

18.1

0.4

ST. HELENA

23.0

18.1

0.4

FALKLANDS

22.9

4.6

1.6

UK (Brize Norton)

10.6

-0.8

17.6

Past Week’s Weather

UK

Unsettled and fairly cold conditions for much of the week with large amounts of cloud and outbreaks of rain at times. In comparison to previous weeks it was a wet one with 17.6 mm rainfall recorded. High pressure brought more settled conditions to the weekend, but this allowed fog and mist to form.

Falklands

A good weather week for the Falklands, with partly cloudy skies and sunny spells. There were a few showers on Tuesday, with heavier showers reported on Saturday. Winds were strong at times, mostly from a westerly direction.

Ascension

A drier week in Ascension, with only Trace amounts of rainfall recorded at Travellers Hill! Generally the mornings have been partly cloudy, but with widespread sunshine developing during the afternoon.

St. Helena

Mostly dry with a good deal of sunshine. A few showers were reported on Wednesday. Rather breezy at times with gusts up to 30 KT recorded.

 

Northern Lights By Mr Frosty

There have been many reported sights of the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) in northern parts of the UK this week due to increased sun activity.

 

So what exactly is the Aurora?

An aurora is a natural display of light in the sky and it can be found at both poles. Near the South Pole they are the Southern Lights (Aurora Australis), and near the North Pole they are the Northern Lights.

 

The aurora is caused by the collision of energetic charged particles with atoms in the high atmosphere. The charged particles originate in the solar wind and are directed by the Earth’s magnetic field into the atmosphere. The solar wind is the result of processes on the sun’s surface which throw particles far out into space.

 

Collisions with oxygen produces yellows and greens and reds. Collisions with atoms of nitrogen give off a blue colour. The light displays can be seen for just a matter of minutes or up to an entire evening.

 

 

Crown Copyright 2011. Met Office.

Met Office  Ascension Island Base

 

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