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The Islander Newspaper Ascension Island
  Issue No. 2226 Online Edition Thursday 21 August 2014 
Home | October 2011 Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Ascension : Met Office Ascension Island Base - The Met Office Weather Report
Submitted by The Islander (Met Office) 07.10.2011 (Article Archived on 21.10.2011)

UK: High pressure over Europe and low pressure over the North Atlantic brought a very warm and sunny southerly flow over much of Britain for most of the last week.

 

Statistics for the week ending Monday 9-Oct-11

 

Max (Celsius)

Min (Celsius)

Rainfall (mm)

AIRHEAD

27.8

21.5

0.5

TRAVELLERS

28.8

19.6

6.6

RESIDENCY

25.3

16.2

11.8

GEORGETOWN

28.9

20.4

1.1

ST. HELENA

18.3

14.4

0.5

FALKLANDS

9.9

-1.3

5.3

UK (Brize Norton)

28.3

9.5

0.6

UK: High pressure over Europe and low pressure over the North Atlantic brought a very warm and sunny southerly flow over much of Britain for most of the last week. There were a few rain showers at first; and the far north and west did occasionally see increased cloud and some rain. This last weekend Northern Ireland and most of Scotland returned to cooler weather with some heavy rain, while many parts of England, Wales and the south of Scotland continued to see record or near record high temperatures. This ¡°Indian Summer¡± set a new UK October record at Gravesend on Saturday 1st with a maximum of 29.9C. The coming week is set to be cooler with temperature near or a little below normal, with some rain or showers for many.

Falklands: A ridge of high pressure was in charge at first, with fine dry weather but night frosts. A low moved east during Thursday with rain and strong winds. Then by late Thursday a cold SW¡¯ly wind brought some wintry showers.

Ascension: This is the rather cloudy season, and the weather is true to form, though most days saw the cloud break to give some sunny periods in the afternoon. A few drizzly showers, but generally dry.

St Helena: Mostly cloudy throughout the week, with just a few brighter spells. Though there were sunny spells this last Saturday. A few light Showers Thursday, otherwise dry.

 

Worldwide this last week:  Tropical storms have produced much flooding and storm damage in parts of the Philippines as Typhoon Nesat moved over the country. This storm then moved on to give 100mph winds and heavy rains to Hong Kong and some coastal regions of Southern China. Another Typhoon, Nalgae struck the Philippines on the 1st Oct with winds of 120mph. NE India saw some heavy monsoon rain and flooding. Thailand and Cambodia also saw some flooding from Tropical Storm Haitang. There was a hurricane, Ophelia, in the Atlantic this last weekend but it will turn north and avoid most land areas, perhaps affecting Bermuda though.

 

**********************************

 

Indian Summer.

There are many names for this phenomenon. In much of Europe, 'Indian summer' was called 'Saint Martin's Summer', referring to St Martins Day on November 11th, when it was supposed to end. This term may originate in France where it is still widely used. In Bulgaria and many Slavic countries it is sometimes called ¡°Gypsy Summer". In Germany and Austria it is called "Altweibersommer" ("Old Ladies' Summer"), In China it is referred to as "qi¨± l¨£oh¨³" (ÇïÀÏ»¢), which literally means 'a tiger in autumn'.

The Met Office¡¯s Meteorological Glossary, defines it as a warm, calm spell of weather occurring in autumn, especially in October and November.

The origins of the term Indian summer are a little uncertain, but several writers suggest it may be have been based on the warm, hazy conditions in autumn when native American Indians chose to hunt. The earliest record of the use in America, by European settlers, is at the end of the 18th century. - ¡°Sometimes the rain is followed by an interval of calm and warmth which is called the Indian Summer; its characteristics are a tranquil atmosphere and general smokiness. Up to this epoch the approaches of winter are doubtful; it arrives about the middle of November, although snows and brief freezes often occur long before that date.¡±

The term was first used in the British Isles at the beginning of the 19th century, but there is no statistical evidence to show that such a warm spell tends to recur each year. The warmest recorded October Day in the UK was 29.4¡ãC on 1 October 1985, in Cambridgeshire. - Until this year that is when 29.9 was recorded.

 

 

Compiled by  Chill       

Crown Copyright 2011        Met Office Ascension Island Base

 

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