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The Islander Newspaper Ascension Island
  Issue No. 2208 Online Edition Saturday 19 April 2014 
Home | October 2010 Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Ascension : Met Office - Weather Report
Submitted by The Islander (Met Office) 14.10.2010 (Article Archived on 28.10.2010)

Statistics for the week ending Monday 11-Oct-10

 

Statistics for the week ending Monday 11-Oct-10

 

Max (Celsius)

Min (Celsius)

Rainfall (mm)

AIRHEAD

27.9

20.9

0.3

TRAVELLERS

27.2

18.1

1.1

RESIDENCY

23.7

16.5

1.7

ST. HELENA

21.1

12.3

9.4

FALKLANDS

12.2

-0.9

8.3

UK (Brize Norton)

20.9

6.0

4.2

UK: Unsettled weather across the UK at the start of the week, but settling down by the weekend as high pressure dominated the UK bringing extended periods of sunshine to most.

Falklands: A bright start to the week with isolated showers but turning increasingly windy and cloudy approaching the weekend. Gale force winds over the weekend almost delaying the air bridge.

Ascension: Dry and sunny for the first half the week with much lighter than average winds. Cloud increased by the weekend with more in the way of drizzly showers particularly up at Travellers Hill and Green Mountain. Warmer than average throughout the week.

St. Helena: The week began with a few days of low cloud with drizzle and hill fog in places. This was due in part to lighter than average winds affecting St Helena at the start of the week, similar to Ascension. The rest of the week remained mainly cloudy but much drier.

 

Welsh weather hits the Ryder Cup

The Ryder Cup is one of the world’s greatest golfing competitions. The golfing elite from America and Europe battle it out against each other for nothing more than the honour of winning. Held every two years, usually in September, this year the competition was to be held from Friday 01st of October to Sunday 03rd at Celtic Manor near Newport in South Wales. This year’s tournament will go down in history not just because of the golf, and the tight 14½ to 13½ European win, but also because of the British autumnal weather.

Now as regular readers may remember, the UK was experiencing a period of very unsettled weather that weekend. Friday and Sunday in particular were not the sort of you would want to play a round of golf in, with strong gusty winds and persistent and torrential rain at times. Fridays play was suspended for over 7 hours due to waterlogged fairways and greens. Similarly heavy rain overnight and through Sunday morning delayed the start for a further 5 hours. In total 52.2mm (over 2 inches) of rain between 1730 BST Friday to 1000 BST on Sunday. With so many rounds left to play, the organisers decided that the tournament had to go to a 4th day for the first time in its 83 year history. So what was it that caused more than half the average monthly rainfall to fall in just 3 days?    Cont...

The answer, as with much of the weather experienced in the UK, was due to the position

of the Jet Stream.

The “normal” summer time position of the Jet stream is to the North of the UK, leaving most of the UK with warm dry weather for the majority of the time (Well that’s the theory at least!) During autumn the jet stream and weather fronts associated with it gradually move further south bringing the periods of wet and windy weather that typify the season.

The jet stream this particular weekend was aligned such that the weather front associated with it waved across South Wales and kept developing further waves upwind which then moved across South Wales and much of England. These developing waves brought with them heavy rain and stopped the front itself from clearing east away as most fronts do. This pattern caused the front and its heavy rain and strong winds to stay close to Celtic manor from Thursday to Sunday before finally moving away east by Monday.

So for the first time in Ryder Cup History play continued to Monday and the rest is history.

 

Answer to last weeks word search: “Red sky at night Ascensions delight”

 

Compiled by Wayne Bow

Crown Copyright 2010

 

Met Office Ascension Island base

 

 

 

 

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